1. Modern Baseball - You're Gonna Miss It All
  2. Charli XCX - Sucker
  3. Butterfly Fairweather - Have Yourself
  4. Paolo Nutini - Caustic Love
  5. El Vez - Merry MeX-mas
  6. The Decemberists - Alternative Rock X-mas
  7. The Orwells - Disgraceland
Positive


Merry Christmas!



Always reblog Shaun T.

Fuck yeah I’ll email you Joshua — I’ve only been waiting my entire life for something like this to happen. pic.twitter.com/YuC5EOfB4u

— Miranda July (@Miranda_July) December 22, 2014

“Trauma is all-too-real, and experiences that throw those who have been traumatized back into painful memories of their trauma are all-too-real. But how common is it, really? How important is it, really, to avoid triggering events? Is not being reminded of a trauma others cannot be reasonably expected to know anything about the sort of thing to which we might be morally entitled? Does anyone have a right not to be triggered, such that we’re all obligated not to do it? Is there any science about this that might help answer these question? It turns out there is! And because it confirms my biases I am eager to share it with you.”

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On The Right Not To Be “Triggered” «Will Wilkinson @ The Dish

Curious about what Dr. Rodebaugh has to say about this.

(via mikewebkist)

The Director of the Webkist Institute wondered if I have a comment on this point, and essentially I agree with my colleagues quoted in the piece, as well as, for the most part, the conclusions of the person who wrote it.

It is certainly civilized, kind, and polite to avoid bringing up during conversation things that one knows a friend is not ready to face yet. It is also generally a long-expected practice for teachers to give a warning before presenting something that most people would find difficult to take (e.g., gory images, etc.)—those “somethings” are typically stimuli that don’t require a lot of conditioning to get humans to react to strongly.

The entire nature of PTSD, however, is that the person has been conditioned to have a strong reaction to things that do not, in most people, elicit such a reaction. As such, a search to provide warnings for all things that can trigger a mild elevation in PTSD symptoms is ultimately a fool’s errand on the part of anyone who must attempt to communicate with many people at once. With a large enough audience, some number of people will be “triggered” by subjects that seem entirely safe to you. As a result, it seems to me that society would be far better off with an emphasis on “if you’re getting triggered, here are some ways you can get help” rather than “if you’re speaking to people, do your best to avoid triggers.”

Put another way, if you feel like you are writing something that needs a “trigger warning,” perhaps you could consider a “here’s how to get help” link as well. I certainly don’t mind people trying to be nice to other people, but wouldn’t it be nicer if folks didn’t have to constantly run the risk of being triggered by things that other people can’t anticipate? Treatment works for that.

(via drrodebaugh)

“Trauma is all-too-real, and experiences that throw those who have been traumatized back into painful memories of their trauma are all-too-real. But how common is it, really? How important is it, really, to avoid triggering events? Is not being reminded of a trauma others cannot be reasonably expected to know anything about the sort of thing to which we might be morally entitled? Does anyone have a right not to be triggered, such that we’re all obligated not to do it? Is there any science about this that might help answer these question? It turns out there is! And because it confirms my biases I am eager to share it with you.”

-

On The Right Not To Be “Triggered” «Will Wilkinson @ The Dish

Curious about what Dr. Rodebaugh has to say about this.